Radio Station – 937 The Wave http://937thewave.com/ Wed, 21 Jul 2021 11:13:54 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://937thewave.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-150x150.png Radio Station – 937 The Wave http://937thewave.com/ 32 32 Arsenal prepare a coup for Leicester’s James Maddison https://937thewave.com/arsenal-prepare-a-coup-for-leicesters-james-maddison/ https://937thewave.com/arsenal-prepare-a-coup-for-leicesters-james-maddison/#respond Wed, 21 Jul 2021 08:10:14 +0000 https://937thewave.com/arsenal-prepare-a-coup-for-leicesters-james-maddison/ James Maddison is reportedly a transfer target for Arsenal, but will Leicester be tempted by a cash plus player deal? Plumb Images / Leicester City FC via Getty Images Euro 2020 and the Copa America are over and the summer transfer window is open, giving Europe’s biggest clubs the chance to create a sensation in […]]]>

Euro 2020 and the Copa America are over and the summer transfer window is open, giving Europe’s biggest clubs the chance to create a sensation in the market. Check out the latest gossip below, and check out all the official offers here.

TOP STORY: Gunners surround Maddison

Arsenal could be set to offload a number of players as they step up their pursuit of Leicester City playmaker James maddison.

the Daily mail reports that Mikel Arteta sees the 24-year-old as a key target this summer after lender Martin Odegaard leaves Real Madrid.

The Foxes are believed to be unwilling to listen to a £ 50million bid at this point, but a move that includes a player going the other way could tempt them.

Maddison has impressed many since joining Leicester in 2018 from Norwich City for just over £ 20million. He made 98 Premier League appearances during this span, scoring 38 goals. The performances managed to convince England boss Gareth Southgate in 2019, who offered him his first senior international cap against Montenegro.

The two Arsenal players who would be available in any deal are Reiss nelson and Ainsley Maitland Niles. Both academy graduates have had high-flying experiences, and while a deal including the two may be difficult, the Gunners believe it could be done.

Nelson, 21, has made 22 Premier League appearances and 23 Bundesliga appearances on loan at Hoffenheim, but has yet to fully integrate the Arsenal squad despite his potential.

Maitland-Niles, 23, spent last season on loan at West Bromwich Albion, making 26 appearances in a campaign that ended in relegation.

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09.42 BST: Tottenham have started negotiations with Sevilla to sign the Spanish midfielder Bryan gil, according to COPE Radio.

Spurs made an offer of € 25million plus variables and included the Argentina midfielder Erik Lamela in the case to entice Gil to the London outfit.

Gil, 20, has caught the attention of many clubs after scoring four goals and adding three more in 29 league appearances while on loan from Sevilla to Eibar last season. His contract with Sevilla runs until June 2023. Earlier this summer, Valencia had approached Sevilla to sign Gil on a one-season loan with an option to buy included in the offer. However, the deal did not materialize.

Gil, who has made three appearances for Spain’s senior team, is one of 22 players nominated by Spain coach Luis de la Fuente to compete in the Olympics.

09:00 BST: Rennes president Nicolas Holveck said the club were “open” to discussing a deal to get rid of Manchester United’s goal Eduardo Camavinga this summer.

Sources told ESPN that United are monitoring the 18-year-old’s situation at Rennes and Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is also keen to add a midfielder to his squad.

Camavinga still has a year on his Rennes contract and the club president has said he is ready to let the midfielder go at the right price.

“One of the priorities is to reduce the workforce,” Holveck told French radio RMC. “We still have eight or nine players who have to leave. There is also the situation with Eduardo.

“Discussions are still ongoing, everything is open, either for a departure during this transfer window – if an offer satisfies everyone – or to extend [Camavinga’s deal]

“He won’t be leaving on the cheap, we’ve had a lot of talk but nothing is complete one way or another.”

TRADE PAPER

– Paris Saint-Germain did Paul pogba their priority as a marquee signing this summer according to the Mirror. The France international could discuss a move to a new club abroad in January due to his contract being cut, putting additional pressure on Manchester United to move him if a deal cannot be reached that time. summer. PSG boss Mauricio Pochettino is said to be looking to raise funds through player trading in order to make an offer for Pogba this summer. It is reported that around £ 50million could be enough to secure the Red Devils midfielder if a deal is not reached.

– Arsenal take an interest in Barcelona goalkeeper Neto according to Mundo Deportivo. The 32-year-old is one of many players allowed to leave Nou camp this summer as the Catalan side seek to free up salaries in order to register new recruits. Barca have reportedly requested around € 14million for the player when approached for him a few months ago. Brazil’s representatives believe the Gunners are the more viable option. Tottenham were another linked team, but Pierluigi Gollini’s arrival at Spurs will have reduced any chance of that move.

– Lyon increased its valuation by Houssem Aouar ahead of a potential battle for the midfielder’s signing this summer. Le10sport reports that the initial valuation was € 20-25million, but after much interest in the player it rose to € 30-35million. Manchester United, Liverpool, Tottenham and Arsenal are clubs linked to the coveted 23-year-old. The Gunners are reportedly leading the pack with a first offer sent out a few weeks ago, but no new offers have been sent since talks began.

– Juventus set a £ 35million valuation on the defender Merih Demiral according to Goal. The 23-year-old has been linked with a move to Everton since Rafa Benitez arrived and, after a season of sporadic appearances, Juve could let the center-back go. Roma and Atalanta are two clubs also linked to the Turkish international.

– Liverpool have set a valuation of £ 15million for Harry wilson in the midst of Fulham’s interest according to the Athletic. The 24-year-old has been linked with a number of clubs including Benfica, Brentford and West Brom, but talks between the Reds and Fulham for the winger are ongoing. The Welsh international has spent the last few seasons on loan including at Bournemouth, Derby and Cardiff and his impressive second tier numbers have sparked interest as the Cottagers look to bounce back to the Premier League on first demand.



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North State Public Radio Series Wins National Reporting Awards https://937thewave.com/north-state-public-radio-series-wins-national-reporting-awards/ https://937thewave.com/north-state-public-radio-series-wins-national-reporting-awards/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 17:18:03 +0000 https://937thewave.com/north-state-public-radio-series-wins-national-reporting-awards/ The stories that North State Public Radio (NSPR) reported on the impacts of the historic camp fire and the global COVID-19 pandemic were recently recognized as national award winners. The Public Media Journalists Association (PMJA) released the 2021 award list in late June, and two NSPR Newsroom series won awards in the Small Market Radio […]]]>

The stories that North State Public Radio (NSPR) reported on the impacts of the historic camp fire and the global COVID-19 pandemic were recently recognized as national award winners.

The Public Media Journalists Association (PMJA) released the 2021 award list in late June, and two NSPR Newsroom series won awards in the Small Market Radio category.

“Radio saves lives,” that’s what one of our listeners told me the day before we launched our special COVID-19 coverage, ”said Sarah Bohannon, news director at NSPR (Journalism, ‘ 13), who oversaw both projects.

Bohannon and NSPR took those words to heart, airing a host of special episodes with a particular focus on each topic, just as the station did during the Oroville Dam Spillway incident in February 2017 and the camp fire in November 2018.

“At NSPR, our job is to be there when our community needs us,” said Bohannon. “I’m proud to say we were.

NSPR won first place in the Audience Engagement Program category for its series “Hunger in the burn scar. “For survivors of the deadliest fire in California history, the pandemic has been disaster upon disaster. But before the 2018 campfire or COVID-19 hit the region, the food insecurity was already pervasive.

Thanks to a community engagement grant from the Center for Health Journalism at USC Annenberg, the NSPR produced a program on the prevalence of enduring food insecurity in burn scar more than a year after the fire. The program contained five 30-minute episodes, and the reporting included months of engagement efforts, including filing in communities affected by the fire and a food insecurity survey that received over 100 responses and was shared with community agencies that lacked data.

The station also got second place in the Continuous Coverage category for “COVID-19 special coverage. “Three days before the pandemic triggered the shelter-in-place order in California, the NSPR press team created a 30-minute daily program covering COVID-19.

The episodes of the series contained a newsletter on the latest figures on local and national cases and deaths from the virus, reports and interviews with public health officials, law enforcement and politicians, scientists, agencies, nonprofits and community members. NSPR maintained this strong COVID-19 coverage for 90 episodes, which aired from March 16 to July 31, with the team working remotely.

“The NSPR has found a way to educate the region on a huge and rapidly changing history while overcoming technical challenges,” said Andre Byik, NSPR reporter. “I am happy that we have done so much good work in and for the community. “

PMJA presented 203 awards to 88 organizations, recognizing the best journalism work in public media across the country. The stations compete with others with similarly sized newsrooms, and the judges reviewed nearly 1,300 entries in total.

NSPR is a member station and service of California State University’s award-winning National Non-Commercial Public Radio, Chico, offering the best programming from national and international sources, as well as locally produced news, music and information programming. . Partnering with CapRadio since October 2020, NSPR has served communities in Northern California for over 50 years and can be heard on KCHO 91.7 FM Chico, KFPR 88.9 FM Redding and smaller translators in Burney, Chester, Dunsmuir, Mount Shasta, Greenville, Hayfork, Oroville, Weaverville and Westwood. NSPR can be heard online at mynspr.org.

NSPR began broadcasting from CSU, Chico in 1969 from a room behind the Laxson Auditorium with a signal that extended to the city limits of Chico. Over the years, it acquired KFPR in Redding and, through broadcast translators, gradually expanded its signal to serve the valley and mountain communities of the Northern State. The station eventually moved to its current home at 35 Main Street, where it currently operates and broadcasts under the management of CapRadio in Sacramento.


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Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM — Livingston County Michigan News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates, and the Best Classic Hit https://937thewave.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit/ https://937thewave.com/radio-station-whmi-93-5-fm-livingston-county-michigan-news-weather-traffic-sports-school-updates-and-the-best-classic-hit/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 12:19:26 +0000 https://937thewave.com/?p=125 Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM — Livingston County Michigan News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates, and the Best Classic HitABC News Photo Illustration, Sources – USGS, Bureau of Reclamation, Lakes Online (NEW YORK) — California was once the site of a gold rush. But now arguably one of the most precious commodities in parts of the state and in the Southwest is something else entirely — water — as the region grapples with a […]]]> Radio Station WHMI 93.5 FM — Livingston County Michigan News, Weather, Traffic, Sports, School Updates, and the Best Classic Hit
ABC News Photo Illustration, Sources – USGS, Bureau of Reclamation, Lakes Online

(NEW YORK) — California was once the site of a gold rush.

But now arguably one of the most precious commodities in parts of the state and in the Southwest is something else entirely — water — as the region grapples with a decades-long megadrought that experts say has been spurred on by a warming Earth.

Farmers struggle to water their crops. Less snowpack feeds rivers, streams and lakes in areas surrounding the mountains. And what little runoff there is from snow in the spring is immediately sopped up by the arid soil before it can reach important bodies of water.

A February report from the California State Water Resources Control Board, for instance, said the question is not whether warming will occur, but the “magnitude of warming” instead and says the state is facing the “threat of greater scarcity of water supplies, increased water demand, and limited water supply reliability.” The report said the state said it has taken “bold” actions to reduce the effects of climate change as well as increase water resilience such as the expansion of recycled water.

And the Southern Nevada Water Authority, which gets 90% of its water from the Colorado River, acknowledges it is “facing the worst drought in the basin’s recorded history” and has been working to address the drought’s impact on water supply for 20 years, including using 23 billion fewer gallons in 2020 than 2002, despite a massive population growth.

Water levels in major bodies of water in the Southwest — both natural and manmade — are approaching historic lows as the drought is exacerbated by heatwave after heatwave during a dry season that started earlier this year.

“The American Southwest has always been at risk for this, but climate change even pushes that risk much, much higher,” Brad Udall, climate research scientists at Colorado State University’s Colorado Water Institute, told ABC News.

While some water variation level is cyclical, experts fear that prolonged warming, combined with diversion and other human activities, are putting the region at risk. The Southwest is “particularly dependent” on surface water, so “even a small increase in temperature — which drives evaporation — or a decrease in precipitation in this already arid region can seriously threaten natural systems and society,” the Environmental Protection Agency said.

The region, which is normally hot and dry, has experienced temperatures above the long-term average, with some areas 2 degrees warmer, over the past 20 years and some parts are “experiencing long-term reductions in mountain snowpack,” according to the EPA.

The depletion of these water sources could be disastrous as it affects the supply for drinking for tens of millions of people and agriculture, ruins local biodiversity by eliminating crucial habitat and negatively impacts billion-dollar economies, experts say.

Here is how the ongoing megadrought is affecting five major bodies of water in the West:

Lake Mead, Nevada and Arizona

Earlier this month, Lake Mead, the massive reservoir formed by the Hoover Dam on the Colorado River, hit its lowest water levels since the lake was created in 1935.

Water levels at Lake Mead — and Lake Powell on the other side of the Grand Canyon, the second-largest reservoir in the U.S. — are headed toward being 30% less than what they were 20 years ago at the start of the most recent warming period, Udall said.

“There are huge, big bathtub rings very visible at both Lake Mead and Lake Powell,” Udall said, referring to previous high water levels.

Minor cutbacks in water deliveries are expected next year if water levels in Lake Mead do not rebound. Another couple of bad years would result in a “major shortage,” Udall said.

If water levels drop low enough, it would be the first-ever official water shortage declared in Arizona and Nevada, and the governments could order cutbacks.

Folsom Lake, California

One of California’s largest reservoirs, Folsom Lake, is crucial to providing water to the more than 40 million residents in the Golden State but is also in danger of drying up.

Severe drought conditions in the West have left barely any snowpack on the neighboring Sierra Nevada Mountains, contributing to record lows in the reservoir, which is used for drinking water, fisheries in the American River, which feeds the lake, and farming and agricultural purposes, Rich Preston-Lemay, the sector superintendent for Folsom Lake Park, told ABC News.

The lake is 68 feet lower than it was last year — the equivalent of a five-story building, ABC San Francisco station KGO reported earlier this month. Memorial Day visitors were surprised to find that only one of the lake’s 13 boat ramps was operating over the holiday weekend, the station said, and there has been zero precipitation so far in June, according to the Bureau of Reclamation.

The water has receded so much that a plane that crashed in 1986 was visible from the bottom of the lake, the Placer County Sheriff’s Office announced on June 16. Despite the drought, the lake is not at a record low. That came in 1977 after the Great Drought at 347.57 feet. Its current elevation is 388.61 feet.

Officials are in a “race against time” to protect communities and other natural resources from the effects of climate change, California Natural Resources Secretary Wade Crowfoot told ABC News.

“Climate change impacts have become a matter of protecting communities in California — worsening wildfire risk, worsening drought, extreme heat,” he continued. “We used to think about preparing for climate change impacts as sort of a future planning exercise for coming decades. Now, we’re actually responding to it as the public safety imperative.”

Lake Tahoe, Northern California and Nevada

Variability in water levels is typical at Lake Tahoe, a 22-mile-long and 12-mile-wide lake on the border of California and Nevada — dropping during the summer and rising during the early part of the year, Geoffrey Schladow, director of the Tahoe Environmental Research Center at the University of California, Davis, told ABC News.

But the combination of less snowpack, drought and increased usage by humans has left the water just about 2 1/2 feet above the natural rim of the lake at the start of the dry season — and it will only continue to empty as the season goes on, Schladow said.

Come October, the water will likely be at the rim, which means water will no longer naturally flow out of the lake and into the Truckee River, the sole outlet of Tahoe and an important source of irrigation along adjacent valleys, Schladow said. The Truckee River also feeds into Pyramid Lake, which supplies water for the city of Reno.

The water level was already lower due to a relatively dry year in 2020 that added little volume to the lake, Schladow added.

In May, water levels in Lake Tahoe were so low that some boats could not be launched from ramps and docks. The City of South Lake Tahoe even closed a boat ramp to motorized boaters for 2021 due to the low levels, ABC Sacramento affiliate KXTV reported.

Despite the drop, the communities surrounding Tahoe likely won’t suffer as much as those who depend on reservoirs elsewhere in the West that supply water to millions of people, Schladow said. Lake Tahoe, by contrast, is massive and serves just tens of thousands of residents, rather than millions.

Scientists and lawmakers who monitor the lake are not yet overly concerned about the water levels in Tahoe because fluctuations are normal — the last time water levels went below the rim was in 2016. However, if the trend were to continue over the next few years, and the region continues to experience dry winters, concerns may be raised, Schladow said.

“We’re not in any imminent or real danger of not being able to supply in basin water needs, at least not for the next few years,” he said.

Great Salt Lake, Utah

The Great Salt Lake, the largest saltwater lake in the world and the eight-largest terminal lake — with no natural outlets — has lost at least half of its water since the first settlers arrived in the region in 1847, a 2017 study published in Nature Geoscience found.

The decline is mostly a result of humans redirecting the water from streams and rivers that feed the lake for use in homes, farms and industries, the study found, with levels dropping 11 feet over the past 150 years — despite a peak elevation of 4,211.6 feet in 1986-87. The usage has been aggravated by drought and climate change, leaving water levels at near-historic lows, Laura Vernon, Great Salt Lake Coordinator for the Utah Department of Natural Resources, told ABC News.

The lake levels are currently at three-tenths of a foot away from the historic low set in 1963, Vernon said, adding that she expects that barrier to be broken within weeks. Experts and lawmakers in the region are currently coming to terms with “what that means exactly,” she added.

The drops are even more significant considering the size of the lake. At 1,700 square miles, “it takes a lot of water to make a change,” Vernon said, adding that it was likely “something continuous over time” to make a difference in the water levels.

The economic impacts of a drying Great Salt Lake could be devastating. In 2012, the Salt Lake Advisory Council valued the annual economic industry from the lake at $1.3 billion, Vernon said. Depending on how low the water levels were to get, there could be a $1.69 billion to $2.17 billion economic loss every year for the brine shrimp harvesting and mineral operations, the products of which would dwindle as the lake recedes, she added.

The skiing industry could be affected as well, as the lake effect snow that is created as a result of the moisture over the lake would cease to exist, Vernon said. And if the snowpack on the mountains doesn’t stay frozen, it will all rush down at once and fail to consistently provide water to the surrounding communities, Vernon said.

Human health can take a toll as well as water recedes, exposing more of the lake bed embedded with decades worth of heavy metals and toxic substances within the sediment. When the bed dust is exposed for long periods of time, the particles can end up in the air and can pose a danger as residents breathe it in, experts say.

The biodiversity the lake promotes would dwindle as well. About 10 million birds stop over at the lake every year to rest and feed during their migration routes — such as the Pacific Flyway route before they head to South America, Vernon said.

Colorado River

Water flow in the Colorado River, which supplies water to more than 40 million people and feeds into the two largest reservoirs in the country — Lake Mead and Lake Powell — has decreased by about 20% over the last 100 years, according to a 2020 study by U.S. Geological Survey scientists,

Several scientific papers published in recent years point to human causes for about half of the decline in river flows. The other half is attributed to warmer temperatures, which then lead to higher evaporation and water use by plants, Udall said.

“And if that evaporation goes up slightly, river flow and decline precipitously,” Udall said. “So, roughly speaking, a 1% increase in evaporation can lead to a 5% decrease in river flow.”

The Colorado River system is one of the most important in the country. As the river begins in the Rocky Mountains and wraps across the Southwest before it feeds into the Gulf of California, water is diverted to major cities such as Denver, Los Angeles, Las Vegas, Phoenix, Tucson, San Diego and farms to the south in Mexico. About a quarter of the water in Lake Mead and Lake Powell comes out of the Colorado River system, Udall said.

Recent droughts have been so severe that even in years when the Rocky Mountains experience a high snow pack, the arid soil in the region is so parched that it absorbs up any moisture as soon as it melts and flows down, Udall said.

For instance, in any given year, 50% the water from a full snowpack would be expected to be runoff, Udall said. Despite the warming temperatures, the region saw an 85% snowpack last year — described by Udall as “not a bad year.” But only about 30% of runoff water made it to the river, Udall said.

“On any given day, it’s now likely to be hotter. We have a longer growing season, so more days for it to be hot. And the atmosphere, because it’s warmer, actually wants to absorb or suck up more moisture,” Udall said.

The new trends are “basically our future,” Udall said, adding that scientists have predicted a worst case scenario of a 40% flow loss by 2050.

“It’s very worrisome,” Udall said.

ABC News’ Lindsey Griswold, Anthony Rivas and Jon Schlosberg contributed to this report.

Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.


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Mamelodi community radio is back on air after looting https://937thewave.com/mamelodi-community-radio-is-back-on-air-after-looting/ https://937thewave.com/mamelodi-community-radio-is-back-on-air-after-looting/#respond Tue, 20 Jul 2021 07:30:19 +0000 https://937thewave.com/mamelodi-community-radio-is-back-on-air-after-looting/ Mamelodi community radio is back on air after lootingThrough Jonisayi Maromo 1h ago Share this article: ShareTweeterShareShareShareE-mailShare Pretoria – Mamelodi’s community radio station Mams Radio returned to the airwaves on Tuesday, after being muted by rioters and looters last week, who ransacked its studios in the wave of looting that engulfed Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal. “We are pleased to announce that Mams Radio will […]]]> Mamelodi community radio is back on air after looting

Through Jonisayi Maromo 1h ago

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Pretoria – Mamelodi’s community radio station Mams Radio returned to the airwaves on Tuesday, after being muted by rioters and looters last week, who ransacked its studios in the wave of looting that engulfed Gauteng and KwaZulu-Natal.

“We are pleased to announce that Mams Radio will be back from [Tuesday] July 20, 2021 at 6:00 am from the Breakfast Show, broadcast live from Boston Media House courtesy of Jacaranda FM and Tuks FM, ”said Sipho Mpho Motau, radio station spokesperson .

“We apologize for any inconvenience caused to the Mamelodi community, stakeholders and those who rely on Mams Radio as a beacon of information, hope and lifestyle. The station will air from 6:00 a.m. to 9:00 p.m. Monday through Sunday until further notice, as we continue to engage with donors to help rebuild our studios.

Motau expressed his gratitude to the people and institutions who gave their support to the community station, after the vandalism of its studios in Mamelodi and the theft of equipment.

“The Mams Radio team would like to thank you for your support, your warm messages and your heartwarming donations. We would also like to thank the following stakeholders who have given great support to the station: Grootman FM, Titans Cricket Club, Thot Box and NCRF.

“If there is any information, we will let you know, and for any further correspondence please contact our operations manager. Stay home, disinfect yourself, wear your mask, and stay safe. ”

In a statement released last week, Mams Radio said its broadcast transmitter, studios and other office equipment were vandalized while other items were stolen.

As a result, the radio station said it had not been able to broadcast news and information regarding the community.

At the time, Motau said he opened a case with local police and called on anyone with information about the incident to come forward and notify the police.

The National Association of Broadcasters (NAB) said it was deeply saddened by reports of violence and damage to the country’s broadcasting and telecommunications infrastructure, including the destruction and vandalism of community radio stations and network towers.

Nadia Bulbulia, Executive Director of NAB, said broadcasting played a crucial role in providing information to citizens and communities, especially in times of crisis and emergency, and that the destruction of valuable assets would affect ultimately the ability of citizens to protect themselves.

“Community radio stations are a vital communication channel in South Africa’s three-tier broadcasting system. They depend heavily on donor funding for their survival and the impact of such destruction will be very difficult, if not impossible to overcome.

African News Agency (ANA)


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Ishmael Reed gets the last laugh https://937thewave.com/ishmael-reed-gets-the-last-laugh/ https://937thewave.com/ishmael-reed-gets-the-last-laugh/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 10:01:24 +0000 https://937thewave.com/ishmael-reed-gets-the-last-laugh/ “The crows are gone,” said Ishmael Reed, explaining the songbird chorus. It was a beautiful spring day in Oakland, Calif., And I had just sat down with Reed, his wife, Carla Blank, and their daughter Tennessee in the family garden. The eighty-three-year-old writer looked like “Uncle Ish,” as he calls him on AOL: sunglasses, New […]]]>

“The crows are gone,” said Ishmael Reed, explaining the songbird chorus. It was a beautiful spring day in Oakland, Calif., And I had just sat down with Reed, his wife, Carla Blank, and their daughter Tennessee in the family garden. The eighty-three-year-old writer looked like “Uncle Ish,” as he calls him on AOL: sunglasses, New Balances, a Nike windbreaker, and an athletic cap covering his halo of white hair with black hair. dandelion seeds. He described his war on the neighborhood crows with mischievous satisfaction, as if it was one of his many skirmishes with the New York literary establishment.

“They had a sentry on the telephone line,” he said, and hunted the other birds. But Reed learned to signal with a crow’s whistle – three croaks for a predator, four for a friend, he deduced – well enough to handle the murder. Soon after, he said, “they thought I was a crow.” Now the songbirds were back. The four of us stopped by to listen to their music, a free verse anthology of avian lyrics. When Blank mentioned that a hummingbird frequented the garden, I wondered aloud why the Aztecs had chosen the bird as the emblem of their god of war. Reed instantly responded, “They’re straight for the eyes.”

Ishmael Reed has foiled more than crows with his formidable powers of imitation. For half a century, he was the most fearless satirist in American literature, waging an eternal cultural war on the media spanning a dozen novels, nine plays and collections of essays, and hundreds of poems, including one written in anticipation of his thirty-fifth birthday, is a prayer to stay petty: “35? I wasn’t mean enough. . . Make me mean Tennessee. . . Miles Davis means. . . Pawnbroker means, ”he wrote. “Mean as the town sings Bessie / ‘Where all the birds sing bass.’ “

Her brilliantly idiosyncratic fiction has disguised everyone from Moses to Lin-Manuel Miranda, and laid the groundwork for the freewheeling genre experiences of writers such as Paul Beatty, Victor LaValle, and Colson Whitehead. Yet Reed has always been more than subversion and caricature. Laughter, in his books, unearths legacies suppressed by prejudice, elitism and mass media co-optation. The protagonist of his best-known novel, “Mumbo Jumbo”, is a metaphysical sleuth in search of a lost anthology of black literature whose discovery promises the collapse of the West amid “renewed enthusiasms for the Ikons. aesthetically victimized civilizations “.

It’s a future that Reed has worked tirelessly to achieve. The brainchild of a decades-long insurgency of magazines, anthologies, small publishing houses, and nonprofit foundations, he led the fight for truly “multicultural” American literature – a term he used very much. made to popularize, before he too is co-opted. . Through it all, Reed affirmed the vitality of America’s marginalized cultures, especially those of working class African Americans. “We have a heritage,” he once thundered. “You might think it’s seedy and low and funky and homemade, but it’s there. I think it’s beautiful. I would invite him to dinner.

Many writers of Reed’s age and accomplishment are said to have settled into a leisurely dinner circuit in their honor by now. But he proudly bit the feeding hands. Several years ago, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., a longtime promoter of Reed’s fiction, offered to write the introduction to a Library of America edition of his novels. Reed, who sees Gates as the unelected “king” of black arts and scholarship, scoffed at the offer by demanding a hundred thousand dollar fee for the privilege.

“The fool can say things about the king that others can’t,” Reed told me. “This is the role I inherited.

Many people learned of Ishmael Reed’s name two years ago, with the debut of his play “The Haunting of Lin-Manuel Miranda”. Critics of “Hamilton” had previously addressed its Black-cast revamp of a fraudulent national mythology, but the news that someone hated the musical enough to put on a play about it caused a minor sensation. For those familiar with Reed’s work, the drama was even more compelling: A founding father of American multiculturalism was dealing bullshit about its apotheosis on Broadway and overseeing the production of Toni Morrison’s Tribeca apartment.

“We are focusing on the operation. There is a mosquito in my room. “
Cartoon by Ellis Rosen

In January 2019, I attended a packed reading of “The Haunting” at the Nuyorican Poets Cafe. The legendary arts space of the Lower East Side has staged many of Reed’s plays – he was a friend of its founder, the late Miguel Algarín – but, given Miranda’s Nuyorican background, the choice of location made sense. . The action follows Miranda’s naive and defensive awakening to the sins of the Founding Fathers. Ghosts of Native Americans and black Americans, including a woman enslaved by the family of Hamilton’s wife, Elizabeth Schuyler, lecture the playwright in comical and aggressive monologues, which he desperately parries citing their absence in Ron Chernow’s best-selling Hamilton biography. When Miranda confronts Chernow, the biographer pokes fun at his protégé’s sudden qualms by hinting at Miranda’s corporate partnership: “Do you think American Express hired you because they want a revolution?”

For Reed, “Hamilton” represented the triumph of a multiculturalism far removed from the revolution his own work envisioned. If “Mumbo Jumbo” celebrated the icons of aesthetically victimized civilizations, “Hamilton” used the representation of American racial victims to aestheticize his icons. Reed’s opinion was bolstered last year when new research concluded that Hamilton had kept servants enslaved until his death; Emboldened, Reed broadens his critique. In September, he and Carla Blank will publish “Bigotry on Broadway”, a critical anthology, and in December his play “The Slave Who Loved Caviar”, a story of vampirism in the art world inspired by Andy Warhol’s relationship. with Jean-Michel Basquiat, is scheduled for an Off Off Broadway debut.

“Someone criticized me for being a one-man band,” Reed told me. “But what am I supposed to be, lazy?” Since “The Haunting” he has published a new collection of poetry, “Why the Black Hole Sings the Blues”; a novel, “Les Terribles Fours”; short songs for Audible; and a constant stream of articles settling old scores and commemorating departed friends, like groundbreaking independent black filmmaker Bill Gunn. (Their 1980 collaboration, “Personal Problems,” a “meta-drama” about black working-class life, is featured in a Gunn retrospective now at the New York Artists’ Space.) Neither did it. no longer hesitated to make public appearances, to star in preliminary readings of his pieces to be played as a jazz pianist at an exhibition in London by British designer Grace Wales Bonner. The models paraded on the runway in tunics bearing “Ishmael Reed” and “Conjure”, the title of a first collection of poetry.

There is a measure of challenge to his productivity at the end of his career. Wary of being attached to his great ’70s novels, Reed is spoiling himself for a comeback, and a younger generation receptive to his guerrilla media criticism may be on hand. “I’m called cranky or dying anachronism, so I’m going back to my original literature,” Reed told me. “In the projects, we had access to a library, and I would go and look for books from the Brothers Grimm. Now, he says, “I’m going back to my second childhood. I write fairy tales.

A California literary institution that grew up in Buffalo and made a name for himself in New York City, Ishmael Scott Reed was born in Chattanooga, Tennessee. His mother, Thelma, brought him into the world alone, in the midst of considerable hardship, in 1938. In her autobiography, which her press published in 2003, she describes young Reed as a curious old soul who urged his elders to start reading the newspaper and stop wearing expensive shoes. A superstitious friend noticed tiny holes in his ears and called him a genius.

Thelma moved the family to Buffalo and married Ishmael’s stepfather Bennie Reed, who worked on a Chevrolet assembly line. Until his teens, Reed was an only child in their upwardly mobile working class household, devouring medieval fantasies and radio soap operas like “Grand Central Station.” His reputation as a literary troublemaker started in school, with a satirical essay about a mad teacher who got him kicked out of English lessons. “They weren’t sure whether to give me an A or hire me,” he later wrote. “Critics always have this problem with my work.

When Reed was sixteen, the great black journalist AJ Smitherman, a refugee from the Tulsa massacre in 1921, recruited him for the Imperial star, a local weekly, first as a delivery boy and then as a jazz columnist. He spent three years studying at the State University of New York at Buffalo; There, an encounter with Yeats’ Neo-Celtic poetry sparked an equally neglected interest in black folklore, and a community drama workshop introduced him to Priscilla Thompson, whom he married in 1960. Their daughter , Timothy, was born the same year.

The young family moved into a social housing project and had a tough time supporting spam and powdered milk – often purchased with food stamps – while Reed worked as a nursing aide in a mental hospital . The marriage did not last. Even as his immediate horizons narrowed, Reed’s writing ambitions grew. After interviewing Malcolm X for a local radio station, he felt the call of New York. In 1962, he moved into an apartment on Spring Street, carrying everything he owned in a laundry bag.

In New York City, Reed behaved like a “green pot,” as he put it, earning the Buffalo nickname from a musician friend. But, within a year, he found a home in the Society of Umbra, a collective of writers who published a magazine and was described by one of its founders, Calvin Hernton, as a ” black arts poetry machine ”. It was an ideologically tense incubator of avant-garde expression, whose members included Lorenzo Thomas, NH Pritchard and Askia Touré – later an influence on Amiri Baraka and the black arts movement. Reed shared an apartment with several of the proto-black nationalists in the group, but ultimately resented their dogmatism; It didn’t help, as he wrote, that his die-hard roommates were sometimes unemployed while he was working part-time to pay their rent. (Although he never joined the Black Arts Movement, Reed likes to say that he was its “first patron”.)


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Assessment: The first hours of SENZ, Aotearoa’s new sports radio https://937thewave.com/assessment-the-first-hours-of-senz-aotearoas-new-sports-radio/ https://937thewave.com/assessment-the-first-hours-of-senz-aotearoas-new-sports-radio/#respond Mon, 19 Jul 2021 01:35:25 +0000 https://937thewave.com/assessment-the-first-hours-of-senz-aotearoas-new-sports-radio/ Sport on radio is back with the launch of the local branch of an Australian media giant. Alex Braae – much missed by old Radio Sport – was tuned in for the opening show. “Sport is more than a way of life, a passion. It’s a fabric that complements who we are, ”former Black Caps […]]]>

Sport on radio is back with the launch of the local branch of an Australian media giant. Alex Braae – much missed by old Radio Sport – was tuned in for the opening show.

“Sport is more than a way of life, a passion. It’s a fabric that complements who we are, ”former Black Caps captain Brendon McCullum said on a Six60 backing track when they were making drum’n’bass. It was a lot for 6 a.m. on a Monday morning.

“Well, if that doesn’t get you excited, nothing will,” Israel Dagg snapped. It looked like an ad was about to go through, the audio swam in, McCullum made a false start, another sting was played, then he started again correctly. The very first caller to the new SENZ network – Lance – could not be broadcast for some reason. Nothing makes the radio sound thrilling like a bit of a mess.

“Baz and Izzy” have a pretty easy vibe as broadcasters, although they have continued to insist that they “never went to broadcast school.” They were both fortunate enough to enter the industry as former players known for their personalities, which means they can make a rougher, less polished technique work. Before the first commercial break, their former Radio Sport producer Louis Watt was brought to the air to do the basics, like yelling at sponsors and telling listeners the time.

A bit of danger was introduced early. An interview with winning WTC captain Kane Williamson was teased, provided he picked up the phone – apparently he was in Formula 1.

Being former players, McCullum and Dagg are probably a little more positive and forgiving of athletes than the average fan. About 15 minutes later, the conversation turned to the Warriors, with a discussion of how the country is still proud of the team because of the sacrifices this season has involved. It might be a heroic reading of the sports public’s thoughts on this Warriors’ season, but the comments clearly came out of a respect for the lifestyle the team must lead.

The stereotype of what you’d hear on Radio Sport would probably have been the opposite – that the Warriors are sweet, they’re professional athletes so what are they waiting for, I bet you’d love to play freshman football for that kind of thing. money, blah blah blah. It doesn’t matter that the Radio Sport hosts are largely out of this kind of mentality – the image is set in stone.

Kieran Read and Israel Dagg. (Photo: MARTY MELVILLE / AFP / Getty Images)

But half an hour into the life of SENZ, the breakfast hosts were talking about the value of multiculturalism and diversity in the rugby community, especially at the club level. Dare I say it – has sports radio woken up?

It’s a mischievous way of putting it, but there might actually be something there. The saga about producer Sam Casey is indicative of this. For those who haven’t followed him – Casey wrote a horrific column on women’s rugby that said women were takers rather than donors, and there was a justifiable storm of criticism. But although the column was written before Casey was employed by SENZ, on a platform unrelated to SENZ, and Casey being in a back room, and it was apparently a first strike, he was fired a few weeks before the launch of the station.

During a recent episode of the Between two beers podcast, broadcaster Jason Pine appeared to suggest the sacking may have been a step too far. His opinion is relevant, as he briefly ran SENZ, before realizing that he had taken on too big a job and that his family life would suffer too much. Pine indicated that SENZ may have decided to put a line in the sand on what is and is not acceptable with the sacking.

Sometimes the opening show maybe veered a bit too far into a feel-good positivity. Israel Dagg did an op-ed in which he discussed rumors that Scott Robertson could replace Ian Foster as All Blacks coach. Dagg’s take was that, in fact, the public should support Foster 100%, at least until the end of the year. The segment is billed as “Izzy’s Bomb Squad” (a reference to his full back days) but as he did on the rugby pitch, here he was defusing a bomb rather than shooting from it. a.

It took someone to report it. “I don’t want us to be cheerleaders,” the caller said, noting that Australia and Argentina weren’t particularly good last year and they both beat them. All Blacks. The appellant was also right – the All Blacks have really had a poor 2020. Sports are different, but can you imagine a business journalist telling the public they should give their full backing to an IPO?

Brendon McCullum leads the Black Caps in their final test match, against Australia at Hagley Oval in 2016. (Photo by Ryan Pierse / Getty Images)

It might reflect the slightly awkward spot where Baz and Izzy are currently. They are both very recent players – a few teammates from the representative teams in which they were stars are still there. No one wants former athletes to say how much better they were than the present lot – but in the same way, the media should be prepared to criticize without fear or favor. And you need to leave enough space for callers to express their opinions honestly, otherwise they won’t call.

Athletes will likely be very keen to talk to SENZ. Kane Williamson finally arrived and he gave an interview that seemed a bit more in-depth than he normally does. Williamson is somewhat known for playing with a far too straight bat with the media, but on SENZ he took sincerity to heart and returned the favor.

Injured All Blacks captain Sam Cane also brought his particular style of mumbled brutality, in an interview with mid-morning host Ian Smith. Good questions, good answers, a good production to get the interview across, good radio at all levels.

Smith himself – and more and more broadcasters to come later today like Kirstie Stanway and Rikki Swannell – will likely be crucial to SENZ in the months to come. The first four hours included talks with Kieran Read, Williamson and the current All Blacks captain – all important ‘gets’ that set a very high standard. The opening day buzz will wear off very quickly, and after that, the grind will begin. And daily radio is hell.

There are positive signs that SENZ will be looking to expand the net on their content. Horse racing will likely end up paying a large chunk of the bills, but the Smith show found time to talk to the boss of Surfing NZ about including the sport in the Olympics.

For the generalist sports fan, this station will fill a void left by Radio Sport, and maybe even broaden the conversation around what matters as sport of interest, which would be very welcome. That’s just one man’s opinion, but they’ve done enough this morning to have at least one new regular listener.



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WDEV celebrates its 90th anniversary on the airwaves of Vermont https://937thewave.com/wdev-celebrates-its-90th-anniversary-on-the-airwaves-of-vermont/ https://937thewave.com/wdev-celebrates-its-90th-anniversary-on-the-airwaves-of-vermont/#respond Sun, 18 Jul 2021 01:29:00 +0000 https://937thewave.com/wdev-celebrates-its-90th-anniversary-on-the-airwaves-of-vermont/ WATERBURY, Vermont (WCAX) – WDEV first connected to Vermont radio waves 90 years ago. On Saturday, the network recognized the milestone with a block party. Employees, friends and listeners gathered in Waterbury for the occasion “It has remained steadfast, and it truly is a piece of Vermont,” said Corinth listener Forbes Morrell. Vermonters know WDEV […]]]>

WATERBURY, Vermont (WCAX) – WDEV first connected to Vermont radio waves 90 years ago. On Saturday, the network recognized the milestone with a block party.

Employees, friends and listeners gathered in Waterbury for the occasion

“It has remained steadfast, and it truly is a piece of Vermont,” said Corinth listener Forbes Morrell.

Vermonters know WDEV for its legendary sports, news, music, and niche programming. When residents tune into 96.1 FM, 96.5 FM, 98.3 FM, 101.9 FM, or 550 AM, home and car speakers often greet them with famous local voices.

Among them, Ken Squier, owner of WDEV for 42 years. Squier is at the heart of WDEV, and he says he’s grateful to soak up the celebration with his friends and family.

“It’s an amazing gift that all of these people have stayed with us over the years and made it such a great radio station,” Squier said.

“I am happy not only for the station, but for Ken Squire and the Squire family,” said WDEV general manager Steve Cormier. “You know, they’ve owned a radio station longer than anyone in this country.”

Professionals say part of the charm of WDEV is that it is a local business that operates with Vermont values ​​in mind.

“This station is literally like family, and I’ve never seen anything like it in any place I’ve ever worked,” said Dex Rowe, WDEV’s weekend announcer.

“You just can’t find independent stations that have been around for so long, and there isn’t always something wrong with the businesses, but there is something special about being independent and family-friendly,” said said Brady Farkas, host of Brady Farkas. Sports Show.

After a difficult year weathering the pandemic and personally battling COVID-19 himself, Squier says he looks forward to the next step.

“Well, we’re aiming for 91,” Squier said.

Related stories:

Ken Squier gets a boost from the flood of recovery cards

Copyright 2021 WCAX. All rights reserved.


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Canal Run scheduled for Saturday; more runners expected than ’19 | News, Sports, Jobs https://937thewave.com/canal-run-scheduled-for-saturday-more-runners-expected-than-19-news-sports-jobs/ https://937thewave.com/canal-run-scheduled-for-saturday-more-runners-expected-than-19-news-sports-jobs/#respond Fri, 16 Jul 2021 05:13:08 +0000 https://937thewave.com/canal-run-scheduled-for-saturday-more-runners-expected-than-19-news-sports-jobs/ Nicholas Wilson of Mohawk wins 2019 Canal Run Half Marathon in Hancock, Michigan (Daver Karnosky / The Daily Mining Gazette) HANCOCK – The registration numbers speak for themselves. Reality trumps virtual reality at least in the local racing world. Just ask Angela Luskin, race director of the 46th edition of the Canal Run which will […]]]>

Nicholas Wilson of Mohawk wins 2019 Canal Run Half Marathon in Hancock, Michigan (Daver Karnosky / The Daily Mining Gazette)

HANCOCK – The registration numbers speak for themselves. Reality trumps virtual reality at least in the local racing world.

Just ask Angela Luskin, race director of the 46th edition of the Canal Run which will take place on Saturday in Hancock. After having to take a virtual run in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic, she said people were eager to meet again.

“My entire team is delighted to be back and participate in person. said Luskin, health and fitness manager at UP-Health Portage. “The Canal Run has become a flagship event in the Keweenaw. People want to go out.

She added that this year’s registration for the various races will far exceed the 250 virtual runners in 2020 as well as the 688 runners who ran in 2019.

“We already have 650 registered runners and registrations will continue until Saturday” she said. “We are doing a virtual race again this year, but we only have two people registered. It tells me that people are ready to participate in real time.

Started in 1975 by avid runner and then radio station owner Bob Olson, the Canal Run features a number of runs of varying lengths and styles along the Portage Lake Canal. These include a half marathon, a 10 mile walk or run, a five mile walk or run, and a fun walk or run. two thousand. There is also a wheelchair half-marathon and a five-mile blade race for amputees.

Luskin added that there were some additional safety precautions this year. This includes not having more than 100 runners at the start of a race at a time. There will be no children’s race as in the past, and participants are requested to wear masks on the shuttle to and from the start area.

“We will be giving out individual prizes but there will be no prize-giving ceremony”, she added. “We are delighted to be back and want to keep everyone safe. “

Since 2011, the Canal Run organizing committee has donated to a non-profit organization in the region as part of its Canal Run Gives Back program. This year, proceeds will go to Omega House in Houghton, which cares for the terminally ill and provides end-of-life care to those in need.

“The planning went well and the support was great” Luskin added. “We are ready to run.

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Bronco Radio Network announces 106.5 Jack FM as new flagship https://937thewave.com/bronco-radio-network-announces-106-5-jack-fm-as-new-flagship/ https://937thewave.com/bronco-radio-network-announces-106-5-jack-fm-as-new-flagship/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 16:19:47 +0000 https://937thewave.com/bronco-radio-network-announces-106-5-jack-fm-as-new-flagship/ History links KALAMAZOO, Michigan – Starting this fall, Western Michigan University’s football, hockey and men’s basketball games will have a new home radio station. Midwest Communications recently transferred its highly successful Jack FM format from Bronco’s former flagship station (WZOX 96.5 FM) to WVFM 106.5 FM. The Bronco Games are also switching to the 33,000-watt […]]]>

KALAMAZOO, Michigan – Starting this fall, Western Michigan University’s football, hockey and men’s basketball games will have a new home radio station. Midwest Communications recently transferred its highly successful Jack FM format from Bronco’s former flagship station (WZOX 96.5 FM) to WVFM 106.5 FM. The Bronco Games are also switching to the 33,000-watt 106.5 FM signal that reaches West Michigan fans throughout the region, serving Kalamazoo, Grand Rapids and Battle Creek.

“Midwest Communications has been a tremendous broadcast partner of WMU Athletics as our flagship Bronco for 23 years and their commitment to broadcast the Broncos on one of their strongest signals, with cross-promotion across their line. of stations in the market, illustrates this partnership and support, ”said deputy director of athletics and voice of the Broncos Robin hook. “The 106.5 FM signal reaches our entire footprint in West Michigan and is also available anywhere online at jack1065.com, through their mobile smartphone app, and on smart speakers like Amazon’s Alexa for Bronco fans inside and outside the listening area, ”Hook added. .

Midwest Communications News Talk legend WKZO 590 AM and 106.9 FM will broadcast men’s basketball or hockey games with conflicting start times, as well as a select schedule of WMU baseball games in the spring.

“I would like to thank the ownership and management team at Midwest Communications for their long-standing partnership with WMU Athletics and their overwhelming support in this move to 106.5 FM for football, hockey and basketball games. male Bronco. This will have a huge impact on our loyal Bronco fans and sponsors in the region, “said WMU director of athletics Catherine Beauregard.

Bronco’s women’s basketball games will continue to be broadcast on Midwest Communications station WTOU 1660 AM and 95.5 FM. Midwest Communications stations WNWN, WFAT, WTVB, WZOX, WKZO, WTOU and WVFM will also broadcast the daily Bronco Update afternoons, Monday through Friday, during the broadcast season (September through May).

“Midwest Communications is delighted to extend its partnership with Western Michigan University Athletics and honored that WVFM 106.5 FM will serve as the new flagship station for Bronco’s football, hockey and men’s basketball,” said Jay Morris, Regional Sales Manager from Midwest Communications. “As a WMU graduate, I know Bronco sports are an important part of the fabric of our community. Western Michigan Athletic Director Catherine Beauregard, his staff and coaches have been amazing to work with and we look forward to continuing these events and programs at our stations for Bronco fans across Western Michigan, ”said Morris.

The fall broadcast schedule opens Saturday, September 4, when the West Michigan football team opens the season in Michigan.



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Brazilian Bolsonaro may need surgery after 10 days of hiccups | Health Info https://937thewave.com/brazilian-bolsonaro-may-need-surgery-after-10-days-of-hiccups-health-info/ https://937thewave.com/brazilian-bolsonaro-may-need-surgery-after-10-days-of-hiccups-health-info/#respond Thu, 15 Jul 2021 03:11:15 +0000 https://937thewave.com/brazilian-bolsonaro-may-need-surgery-after-10-days-of-hiccups-health-info/ The Brazilian president’s office has said Jair Bolsonaro is suffering from an intestinal blockage and may need emergency surgery. Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has been transferred to a Sao Paulo hospital for tests on a potentially obstructed bowel, his office said on Wednesday, after the far-right leader endured a 10-day period of chronic hiccups. The […]]]>

The Brazilian president’s office has said Jair Bolsonaro is suffering from an intestinal blockage and may need emergency surgery.

Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro has been transferred to a Sao Paulo hospital for tests on a potentially obstructed bowel, his office said on Wednesday, after the far-right leader endured a 10-day period of chronic hiccups.

The 66-year-old had publicly complained of hiccups after surgery to a dental implant on July 3.

Sao Paulo’s Vila Nova Star Hospital, where Bolsonaro is now hospitalized, said on Wednesday evening that the president would remain in the hospital “initially under conservative management” following reports he would need surgery emergency.

Communications Minister Fabio Faria said the president’s schedule would be allowed for 48 hours.

Bolsonaro’s son Flavio, speaking to Jovem Pan radio station, said earlier today his father was transferred to an intensive care unit in Brasilia and intubated.

“He ended up being intubated to prevent him from breathing fluid from his stomach,” Flavio Bolsonaro said in the interview.

The president’s office said he was taken to a military hospital in the capital Brasilia “to undergo tests and investigate the cause of the hiccups.”

“This comes at a time when President Jair Bolsonaro is going through the worst period of his two and a half years as president,” said Monica Yanakiew of Al Jazeera, who is in Rio de Janeiro. “The Senate is investigating the government’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic and its popularity has taken a severe hit. “

Journalists stand at the entrance to Vila Nova Star Hospital, where Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro was transferred with abdominal problems after 10 days of hiccups [Amanda Perobelli/Reuters]

Shortly after the news of his transfer to Sao Paulo, Bolsonaro posted on his Facebook page a photo of him smiling with his eyes closed and lying in a hospital bed covered with sensors and cables.

“I thank everyone for their support and prayers,” Bolsonaro said in the post.

Bolsonaro’s health has been a problem for much of his presidency, after he was stabbed in the intestines during the 2018 election campaign and nearly died. The attack required multiple follow-up operations. Pro-Bolsonaro federal lawmaker Bia Kicis wrote on Twitter on Wednesday that Bolsonaro’s hospitalization was “a consequence of the stabbing of 2018”.

President faces mass protests and a Senate committee inquiry into his government’s handling of the coronavirus pandemic, which has killed more than 535,800 people to date, according to data from Johns Hopkins University .

Bolsonaro has also been accused of failing to respond adequately to alleged irregularities in the purchase by the Brazilian Ministry of Health of a COVID-19 vaccine from India. After the irregularity reports were made public, the government suspended the contract.

Citing an anonymous source with knowledge of the matter, Reuters news agency reported on Monday that Brazilian federal police had formally opened an investigation into Bolsonaro into the allegations.

The far-right leader was also accused this month of participating in a scheme to cut the salaries of his aides when he was a federal deputy.

The president has denied all the allegations made against him.

But recent polls show its popularity is waning, which could be bad news ahead of elections scheduled for next year.

Over the weekend, a Datafolha survey showed that 54% of Brazilians support a proposal by the country’s lower house to open impeachment proceedings against Bolsonaro, compared with 42% who oppose it.

It was the first time that a majority of Brazilians supported such a measure.


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